Tuesday, October 26, 2004

CULTURE ALMOST LOST TO LOGGERS

Chimpanzee "Workshop" Discovered in Congo

Scientists have discovered that a remote rainforest in Central Africa, saved from logging by a collaboration among the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society, a timber company and the Republic of Congo, is home to a population of innovative, tool-making chimpanzees that “fish” for termite dinners.

According to a study in the November issue of the journal The American Naturalist, chimps living in the 100-square-mile “Goualougo Triangle” have given researchers a comprehensive snapshot of more complex tool-use among non-human large primates....

But perhaps even most remarkable is the fact that the chimpanzee population still exists in this remote forest....

"Had the Wildlife Conservation Society not helped to save the Goualougo from being logged, this discovery would not have been made and the forest and the chimps would have been lost,” said Steve Gulick of Wildland Security. “At the same time, this study makes one wonder about the unnamed and never-to-be-known Goualougos now threatened before the saw."